Eagles, Part II – The Battle Between Ego and Higher Self

June 7th, 2012 by Laura Longley

On the second day of my Olympic Peninsula adventure, I decided to go to Cape Flattery. Cape Flattery is the most northwest point of the continental United States. I’d been to Key West which is the most southern point, so it seemed kind of fun to go to the most northwest point. Not to mention that it’s in my home state, so why hadn’t I been there in 55 years?

Also, part of the goal of my trip was to spend some time at the ocean, and Cape Flattery is the point where the Strait of Juan de Fuca meets the Pacific Ocean. Pretty cool.

I arrived at the parking lot and saw that there was a trail through the woods that led to the coastline. As I walked the trail there were side trails that led to overlooks of the water crashing below.

I am so bad with distances, but I would say the cliff is a couple of hundred feet above the water crashing below. It is quite rocky, with inlets of water on either side of the land where the trail was.

From these overlooks I could see caves that had been created in the rock from the unrelenting crash of the water. There were lots of birds flying, in the water, and on the rocks: seagulls and several types of water fowl. I was overcome by the power and majesty of nature. To say it was beautiful is a severe understatement.

When I reached the end of the trail there was a raised wooden platform with benches. The vista from this lookout was spectacular! To the north I could see Vancouver Island. directly in front of me to the west was little Tatoosh Island, with the lighthouse. To the south were more rocky cliffs and rocky islands with surf crashing around them. It was spectacular!

I stood and took in the view for a while. Watched all the various birds. Eventually I decided I wanted to just sit and listen to the sound of the ocean. There was no one else around, and I sat on one of the benches and closed my eyes.

I’ve always found the sound of the ocean so soothing. I sat and listened, meditating on the sound. After a few minutes I felt the urge to open my eyes. I had intended to sit like this, just listening, for ten minute or so. But for some reason I felt it was time to open my eyes after just a couple of minutes.

When I opened my eyes, I saw directly in front of me two eagles in the air. I got up and walked to the railing at the edge of the platform to get a better view. This was not two eagles soaring on the thermals as I have  seen before. One of the eagles was definitely chasing the other.

At one point, the eagle being chased landed on an outcropping of rock directly across the cove from where I was standing. However, he didn’t stay long as the second eagle dive-bombed him. He took off into the air again.

On the next pass, the eagle under attack rolled his body so that his claws were facing up. The attacking eagle was flying directly above him, and they struck at one another with their claws in mid-air. This took place at eye level from where I was standing, perhaps 100 feet away.

I felt very distressed witnessing this violence. I was worried that one of them would be seriously injured, and I didn’t want to see that. I said out loud, “Don’t hurt him.” At that point the first eagle flew off to the north and around a point of land to the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

I had hoped that the second eagle would let him go, as he had now successfully run him off. But he followed behind, although at a distance.  I was grateful that whatever may happen next (maybe nothing?) would be out of my sight.

Now that they were gone, I had time to process what had happened. I feel that I was meant to open my eyes when I did. The eagles were only there for a minute or two. If I had continued my meditation (as I originally intended), I would not have seen them.

So, what was the message in this scene? Eagles represent Spirit (God, Source, the Universe). What could two eagles fighting mean? I was highly affected emotionally by what I had witnessed, so I believed there was a message there. But what was that message?

Although I leave myself open to further insights about this experience, what I believe these two eagles locked in battle represent is the battle between Ego and the Higher Self. I view the eagle being attacked as the Ego, and the attacker as the Higher Self.

I have been going through a process of identifying more and more with my Higher Self. Sometimes with greater success than other times, but always with more awareness of which part of me is in control.

What I came to understand from the experience with the eagles, is that both parts of me need to exist; both parts will continue to exist. This is why I cried out “Don’t hurt him.” Ego cannot, and should not, be killed or destroyed. It serves a purpose when kept in check.

But my Higher Self is becoming stronger and more dominant than my Ego. It’s the part that’s in control more of the time now. When Ego tries to assert itself inappropriately, the Higher Self can run it off and send it back to its own territory –firmly, but without harming it.

Conversely, I can see this as a warning that if I allow it, Ego can chase away my Higher Self. Ego cannot kill the Higher Self. It will still exist, but will not be dominant in my perspective and in my choices.

I know this all sounds kind of woo-woo and out there. And at the same time I know I witnessed this scene for a reason. There was a message here for me.

I’m open to other interpretations.  Please share your thoughts.


One Response

  1. […] Eagles, Part II – The Battle Between Ego and Higher Self (blueheronwisdom.wordpress.com) Rate this:Share this:TwitterFacebookMorePinterestDiggStumbleUponTumblrLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. This entry was posted in Garage and tagged Jane Eyre, OlympicPeninsula, Oregon Coast, Pacific, Pacific Ocean, Sea lion, Washington, Wuthering Heights. Bookmark the permalink. ← Kitchen Delights: They Are Coming For You […]

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